David Koresh’s Advertisement


David Koresh, née Vernon Wayne Howell, was the leader of the Branch Davidians cult. In the pre-YouTube era, he searched for followers by placing eye-catching advertisements in religious journals. 

“Dear Brethern in the Seventh-day Adventist Church:

I am the Son of God. You do not know Me nor My name. I have been raised up from the north and My travels are from the rising sun…

…I have been rejected in the person of my Prophets over and over. I have seven eyes and seven horns. My name is the Word of God and I ride on a white horse. I Am here on earth to give you the Seventh’s Angel’s message.

I Am the prophets; all of them. I want to invite you to My marriage supper. The invitation is in Psalms 45. Read it and confess that you don’t know Me. I Am the Word of God.

The key of David is in My hand. I only can open the prophecies of David and Solomon. I have ascended from the east with the seal of the living God. My name is Cyrus and I Am here to destroy Babylon. I have come in a way that is  contrary to your preconceived  ideas. I will reprove you for your world loving. I will scold your daughters for their nakedness and pride that they parade in my Father’s house and by My angels will strip them naked before all eyes before their foolish pride. Read Isaiah 3:13-36.

The young men will abuse My kindness. They will take My life, but I will arise and take theirs forever more.

You ministers will lament your foolishness. Your lost flock will tear you to pieces…

PREPARE TO MEET THY GOD

V.W.H. Jezreel

P.O. Box 1846
Palestine, Tex 75802”

 

 

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Daniel Defoe’s Grave

In Bunhill Fields, London. The inscription on the memorial reads:

“Daniel Defoe, Born 1661 Died 1731 Author of Robinson Crusoe

This monument is the result of an appeal in the CHRISTIAN WORLD newspaper to the boys and girls of England for fund to place a suitable memorial upon the grave of Daniel Defoe. It represents the united contributions of seventeen hundred persons. Septb 1870.”

Photograph: Copyright Justin Griffiths-Wiliams

Harriet Greets her Public in the Mail Online Comments Section

If Britain ever becomes a republic, the revolution might very well begin in the online comments sections beneath articles about the Windsors. A wit commenting in the Guardian suggested if Britain had to have a non-elected head of state, a Golden retriever would make an excellent substitute, because they love shaking hands and don’t have expensive hobbies like flying helicopters. The Daily Mail Online recently posted an article about Prince Harry’s bachelor party with the 32-word headline: “Is Harry planning a stag do on the slopes? Royal protection officers are ‘spotted scoping out locations’ in exclusive Swiss ski resort – and they could stay in Prince Andrew’s £13m chalet”

In the comments section, a regular named “Harriet” segued between railing on Prince Harry and his fiancee Meghan Markle and greeting her many online pals. The commenter “OnYourMark1” alluded to a pertinent point–at a time when record numbers of homeless people are sleeping on Britain’s streets and the National Health Service is in crisis, British taxpayers coughed up for a recce trip to Verbier for Prince Harry’s bodyguards. 

Harriet, Toronto, Canada: Blame it on the combo of Ginger and NutMeg. I adore Harry, but, he has lost his bl00dy mind, as much as I hate to say it, I am going off him too. Hopefully, he snaps out of it before it’s too late, he is making a complete a$s out of himself, and it’s sad.

Korova Milk Bar, Somewhere, United Kingdom: Harriet! You’re back! I’ve missed your comments. 🙂

rosie1 woking, United Kingdom: Welcome back Harriet I wondered where you’ve been …..missed your comments!

Harriet, Toronto, Canada: Thanks Rosie and Korova ! I was on holidays before returning back to London. You know this marriage is bad news when the Leicester Square tat shops aren’t even selling naff wedding merchandise.What a disaster, five years tops, if this wedding even still happens. All the best for 2018, H. x

Alexandra, West Vancouver Hampshire, United Kingdom: Welcome Back Harriet … hugs to B x

Louisa, London, United Kingdom: Delighted to see Harriet back! Harriet called this woman out long before anyone had the slightest idea about her. Harriet said the wedding wouldn’t happen, and with all that has come out (I’m sure there’s much more buried) I can see why Harriet would have thought so – she just hadn’t factored in Harry’s breath-taking stupidity and bl00dy-mindedness.

Harriet, Toronto, Canada: Thanks Louisa, all the best to you for 2018. I may be wrong, but I still cannot see it happening. There is something very wrong with this whole scenario. Harry must be in lust, after dealing with her, day in and day out, he should wake up, hopefully before the wedding. Had they lived on the same continent and he was stuck with her 24/7, there wouldn’t be an engagement. Either way, it all end in tears. All the best, Harriet.xx

OnYourMark1, Victoria, Canada: nice to see you back Harriet – hope it was a lovely vacate (I trust no paid security like Harry’s upcoming do?

 

Mikhail Gorbachev’s Birthday Greeting to Margaret Thatcher

In 2014 a fresh batch of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s papers were declassified at the National Archives. Leave it to the Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev to mention “correct political tone” in his birthday greetings. And poor old Denis Thatcher. He must have spent his entire life saying “It’s just the one ‘n’ in Denis.”

“Esteemed Madame Thatcher,

On the occasion of the remarkable date in Your life please accept my congratulations. Raisa Maximova joins me in our wishes to You of good health and well-being.

I recall our conversation at Chequers and in Moscow. Then, it seems, we took a correct political tone and gave our dialogue such an orientation that meets the demands of the present situation in the world. I would wish to believe that the understanding on the problems of priority that we reached then will remainin force. But for this to be so, apparently, much effort, political wisdom and goodwill will be needed.

Please convey our best wishes to Your husband, Mr. Dennis Thatcher.

Yours respectfully,

M. Gorbachyov

Moscow, 12 October, 1985”

The National Archives,  PREM 19 1647

anya.chapman’s Instagram Account

When the Russian intelligence agent Anya Chapman was arrested for spying, her single phone call was used to contact the British publicity agent Max Clifford, who arranged the sale of her story to the Daily Telegraph. Deported back to Russia in a prisoner swap, Chapman has worked as a television host, a catwalk model, and the head of a youth council for the government. Her Instagram account is a combination of propaganda and glamour shots. She has posed in log cabins and on military gunboats; cradling cheetahs and jack-o’-lanterns.

“Remember the year 2008?” she asked, posing in a field of sunflowers with an enormous rabbit in her arms. “When the war of Georgia with South Ossetia began only in order to raise the ratings of Russophobe McCain, who lost the presidential race to Barack Obama?”

The post below is a good example of the special charm of Anya Chapman’s Instagram feed. It’s like peeking inside Vladimir Putin’s Id.

“It has become known that the US Army has radically modernized its sea-based Trident II nuclear missiles. According to a number of American experts, this has dramatically increased the US ability to launch a preemptive nuclear strike against Russia.

This modernization of ballistic missiles began in 2009, at exactly the same time as Obama offered Russia the infamous, ‘Reset.’

Of course the missile defense system in Europe and Asia is in no way directed at our country. Everyone in America only wishes us well.”

Aldrich Ames on Beating a Polygraph

The CIA double agent Aldrich Ames famously passed two lie-detector tests.

The first time he had a test scheduled he asked for advice from his KGB handlers, who wrote back, “Get a good night’s sleep, and rest, and go into the test rested and relaxed. Be nice to the polygraph examiner, develop a rapport, and be cooperative and try to maintain your calm.”

“Dear Mr. Aftergood,

Having had considerable experience with the polygraph (well beyond that which you referred to), I read your very sensible essay in Science with great interest. I offer you a few comments on the topic for whatever interest or use they may have.

Like most junk science that just won’t die (graphology, astrology and homeopathy come to mind), because of the usefulness or profit their practitioners enjoy, the polygraph stays with us.

Its most obvious use is as a coercive aid to interrogators, lying somewhere on the scale between the rubber truncheon and the diploma on the wall behind the interrogator’s desk. It depends upon the overall coerciveness of the setting — you’ll be fired, you won’t get the job, you’ll be prosecuted, you’ll go to prison — and the credulous fear the device inspires. This is why the Redmond report ventures into the simultaneously ludicrous and sinister reality that citizens’ belief in what is untrue must be fostered and strengthened. Rarely admitted, this proposition is of general application for our national security apparatus.

You didn’t mention one of the intriguing elements of the interrogations of Dr. Lee which is in fact quite common — the false representation to the subject of the polygraph results. Because interrogations are intended to coerce confessions of one sort or another, interrogators feel themselves entirely justified in using their coercive means as flexibly as possible to extract them. Consistency regarding the particular technique is not important; inducing anxiety and fear is the point.

Polygraphers are fond of the technique used by psychics called cold reading, as a slightly less dramatic practice than actually lying to the subject about the results. In this sort of cold reading, the interrogator will suggest to the subject that there may be a potential problem, an ambiguous result, to one of the questions and inquire whether the subject knows of anything that might help clear it up, etc, etc.

Your account of the Redmond report — I haven’t seen it — shows how another hoary slider is thrown past the public. The polygraph is asserted to have been a useful tool in counterintelligence investigations. This is a nice example of retreating into secret knowledge: we know it works, but it’s too secret to explain. To my own knowledge and experience over a thirty year career this statement is a false one. The use of the polygraph (which is inevitably to say, its misuse) has done little more than create confusion, ambiguity and mistakes. I’d love to lay out this case for you, but unfortunately I cannot — it’s a secret too…

…Deciding whether to trust or credit a person is always an uncertain task, and in a variety ofI’ve seen these bureaucratically-driven flights from accountability operating for years, much to the cost of our intelligence and counterintelligence effectiveness. The US is, so far as I know, the only nation which places such extensive reliance on the polygraph. (The FBI, to its credit in a self-serving sort of way, also rejects the routine use of the polygraph on its own people.) It has gotten us into a lot of trouble.

On the other hand, there have been episodes in which high-level pressures to use or acquire certain persons entirely override pious belief in the polygraph. One instance which made the press is that of the Iranian connection in the Iran-Contra affair.

I wish you well in this particularly important theater of the struggle against pseudoscience: the national security state has many unfair and cruel weapons in its arsenal, but that of junk science is one which can be fought and perhaps defeated by honest and forthright efforts like yours.

    • Sincerely,

Aldrich H. Ames
40087-083
P.O. Box 3000
White Deer, PA 17887

P.S. I should say that all my outgoing mail goes through the CIA — unlawfully — for review, censorship and whatever use it chooses to make of it.”

Letter to Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists, November 28, 2000.