Marilyn Monroe’s Affair with RFK Revealed

Fred Lawrence Guile published his biography of Marilyn Monroe in 1969, one year after Robert Kennedy had been assassinated during his presidential run. Norma Jean: The Story of Marilyn Monroe revealed the film star’s affair with the politician, but not his identity.

“Marilyn did not remain completely in seclusion as she had during her similar break with Hollywood and the studio in 1955. Then she had not only withdrawn form the public eye, but socially as well. She had chosen to be alone to reassess her life and to recover her strength. This time she preferred privacy because she was involved with a married man. He was no in the industry; he was an Easterner with few ties on the coast. He had come West mainly to work out the details of a film production of a literary property in which he had had a hand and to escape the pressures of his work as a lawyer and public servant.

It anyone was to blame for the relationship that developed during his California stay, it was his host* who was connected with films and knew Marilyn enough to realize how vulnerable and exposed she was that summer… For the attorney, his holiday on the West Coast was a lark, a vacation from his wife and children. He and Marilyn were discreet, almost never venturing beyond the stuccoed wall surrounding the friend’s beachhouse…

…Their relationship had nowhere to go. Publicity about the affair might destroy all his chances for an important political career. How sensitive he was to Marilyn’s precarious emotional state is difficult ot assess. Within days of their meeting he and Marilyn became nearly constant companions, a relationship interrupted only by his flights to New York or Washington when called on some business that could not be resolved over the telephone.

*Likely Peter Lawford, a friend of Marilyn’s and the husband of RFK’s sister Pat.

Norma Jean: The Story of Marilyn Monroe, Fred Lawrence Guiles, 1969, W. H. Allen & Co. Ltd.

Advertisements